For Those Wishing to Play Chess

Время публикации: 28.08.2014 19:56 | Последнее обновление: 28.08.2014 19:58

Sinquefiled Cup: instructive games of Round 1

Round 1 of the Sinquefield Cup was full of fighting chess. As you know six of the world's ten strongest GMs are competing for the prize.

The situation on the boards was commented live on Chess-News by GM Dreev. According to him the first round "turned out to be very instructive for those willing to play chess." Several useful examples can be found in three encounters we analyse below...

ARONIAN - NAKAMURA

Dreev's favourite Slav defense took place in this encounter. Russian GM is sure Nakamura had to exchange the queens and proceed to the endgame on the 17th move. there he could get a comfortable play maneouvring with his knight Nd7-b8-c6. American chose to move his queen on d8 getiing stuck. Once the position almost left no space for Nakamura to manoeuvre...

...Aronian hastened with forcing the events: 35.Rc8? Instead 35.Qc3! Qxc3 36.bxc3 would lead to an unpleasant endgame. Also interesting was 35.Kf2!?
35...Rxb2 And the draw is inevitable. 36.Qc1 Qa2 37.Qh1 Qa3 38.Qc1 Qa2 39.Qh1 Qa3 40.Qc1 1/2

 

TOPALOV - CARUANA

"Caruana's solid play countered by Topalov's poor decisions," was how Dreev summarized the encounter. Bulgarian GM was the only to lose a game in the first round.  

20.Ncd5? "Honestly, I wouldn't even consider this move at the board. Topalov suddenly changed the active piece, which could take e4 square and have an eye on the black king, on the c7-knight, which actually wasn't functional at all."

Veselin soon faced problems, Italian confidently converted his advanatge. 


VACHIER-LAGRAVE - CARLSEN

This was the most thrilling duel of the round. The rivals competed in the deepest deeps of the opening analysis and it seems that Carlsen was first to be forced to find decisions already at the board in this complex position. According to Dreev, the world champion did it brilliantly. 

21...Kh8! deserves on a special mention, which declines the forced draw: 21...Rxe7 22.fxe7 Qd2 23.Rf2 Qd1+ 24.Rf1 Qd2.

At the this point Carlsen already close to having a time trouble. 
22.Qxc2 Raa6 23.Rac1?! Vachier-Lagrave made this move quite quickly, which could have greatly complicated French GM's position. He could have played 23.Rad1. 
23...Rxf6 24.Rxf6 Rxf6 25.Qxc7

The culmination. Here Carlsen spent six minutes out of the eight left minutes to choose  25...Qd2, he either missed or didn't want to risk with the more precise 25...Qd3! after which Vachier-Lagrave would hardly enjoy his position in the endgame: 26.Qc3 Qxc3 27.Rxc3 Rd6.

Аnd this is the line starting with the check from b8 as it happened in the game, it is  unacceptable with the queen on d3. 
26.Qb8+ Kg7 27.Qg8+ Kh6 28.Qf8+ Kh5 29.Rc5+ g5

And white goes with the draw. 30.Rxg5+.
Now imagine the position on the diagram with the queen on d3: 30.Rxg5+. Mistaken for the play for a win is 30...Kxg5? 31.Qg7+ Rg6 32.Qe5+, and here Dreev calculating the lines without the computer's help thought that 32...f5  was winning (now you can see the difference: the queen on d3 defends the pawn), but white still can escape: 33.h4+! Winning was 30...Kh4!! 31.Rg4+ Kxg4 32.Qg7+ Rg6 33.h3+ Kh4 34.Nxg6+ Qxg6 35.Qd4+ Be4.

30...Kxg5 And the perpetual check is impossible to avoid in all the considered lines. 31.Qg7+ Rg6 32.Qe5+ f5 33.h4+ Kh5 34.Qxf5+ Kh6 35.Qf8+ Kh5 36.Qf5+ Kh6 37.Qf8+ Kh5 38.Qf5+ 1/2  

[Event "2nd Sinquefield Cup 2014"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2014.08.27"] [Round "1"] [White "Vachier Lagrave,M"] [Black "Carlsen,M"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2768"] [BlackElo "2877"] [EventDate "2014.08.27"] [ECO "C45"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Nb3 Bb6 6. Nc3 Nf6 7. Qe2 a5 8. e5 O-O 9. exf6 a4 10. Nd5 Re8 11. Be3 axb3 12. Qg4 g6 13. Bc4 Nb4 14. Nxb4 d5 15. Qf4 dxc4 16. O-O bxc2 17. Nd5 Re6 18. Qxc4 Bxe3 19. fxe3 b5 20. Qc5 Bb7 21. Ne7+ Kh8 22. Qxc2 Raa6 23. Rac1 Rxf6 24. Rxf6 Rxf6 25. Qxc7 Qd2 26. Qb8+ Kg7 27. Qg8+ Kh6 28. Qf8+ Kh5 29. Rc5+ g5 30. Rxg5+ Kxg5 31. Qg7+ Rg6 32. Qe5+ f5 33. h4+ Kh5 34. Qxf5+ Kh6 35. Qf8+ Kh5 36. Qf5+ Kh6 37. Qf8+ Kh5 38. Qf5+ 1/2-1/2 [Event "2nd Sinquefield Cup 2014"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2014.08.27"] [Round "1"] [White "Aronian,L"] [Black "Nakamura,Hi"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2805"] [BlackElo "2787"] [EventDate "2014.08.27"] [ECO "D19"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. e3 e6 7. Bxc4 Bb4 8. O-O Nbd7 9. Qe2 O-O 10. e4 Bg6 11. Bd3 Bh5 12. e5 Nd5 13. Nxd5 cxd5 14. Qe3 Re8 15. Bd2 Qa5 16. Qe1 Bxd2 17. Qxd2 Qd8 18. Ng5 Bg6 19. Bxg6 fxg6 20. f4 Rc8 21. Rac1 Qb6 22. a5 Qa6 23. Qb4 h6 24. Nf3 b6 25. Qd6 Nf8 26. axb6 axb6 27. Qb4 Qd3 28. Qd2 Qb3 29. Rfe1 Rxc1 30. Rxc1 Ra8 31. h4 Ra2 32. Rc2 Ra1+ 33. Kh2 Rb1 34. Kg3 Kh7 35. Rc8 Rxb2 36. Qc1 Qa2 37. Qh1 Qa3 38. Qc1 Qa2 39. Qh1 Qa3 40. Qc1 1/2-1/2 [Event "2nd Sinquefield Cup 2014"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2014.08.27"] [Round "1"] [White "Topalov,V"] [Black "Caruana,F"] [Result "0-1"] [WhiteElo "2772"] [BlackElo "2801"] [EventDate "2014.08.27"] [ECO "A35"] 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nc7 7. O-O e5 8. a3 Rb8 9. d3 Be7 10. Be3 O-O 11. Rc1 Bd7 12. Nd2 Nd4 13. Nc4 f6 14. f4 exf4 15. Bxf4 Nde6 16. Bd2 b6 17. g4 Be8 18. Be1 b5 19. Ne3 Bd6 20. Ncd5 Nxd5 21. Bxd5 Bf7 22. Nf5 Be5 23. Qd2 Nd4 24. Bxf7+ Rxf7 25. Rd1 Nxf5 26. gxf5 Qd4+ 27. Bf2 Qg4+ 28. Kh1 c4 29. Qc2 Re8 30. dxc4 Qh5 31. h4 Qg4 32. Qd3 bxc4 33. Qe3 Rfe7 34. b3 Bb2 0-1 

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